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To Make Your Community Healthier, Make It Denser.

City

In the wake of 9/11, author Stephen Johnson wrote in Wired that "density kills" and advocated turning to the decentralized vision of Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1939 Broadacre City as a way of protecting Americans in the future. As it turns out, he got it backwards: Density saves lives. The contemporary affinity for higher-density, mixed-use, walkable places in cities and suburbs alike arguably represents the single most significant contribution to public health — for those who can afford them — since World War II.

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What States Should Do to Keep Their Cities Out of Bankruptcy

Detroit
To head off problems before they become crises, do states need to monitor their local governments' finances and borrowing practices? Susan K. Urahn, Executive Vice President of the Pew Charitable Trusts, weighs in on the topic with a guest post.

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A Cycle of Positive Development

Colleges and universities have recognized their potential to be the heart of their respective cities and to serve a greater purpose than mere education.

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Zimpher’s Work Earns Presidential Praise

Nancy Zimpher, Chancellor of the State University of New York and immediate past Board Chair for CEOs for Cities, was called “Obama’s favorite college leader” in an article published last week.

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Repurposing Urban Roadways for More Than Just Cars in the Midwest


Photo from flickr user citymaus

Cities throughout the United States are redesigning their roadways to accommodate multiple means of transportation.

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City Valentines

If cities gave out Valentines, what would they say? We took a quick stab at it, and decided to offer a printable and downloadable versions-- so you can share or give them to the thought leaders and city advocates in your life! What would your City Valentine say?

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A New Name / A New Look

Our newsletter has a new name and a new look that better reflects who we are and what we do. The new name is derived from our signature work known as City Dividends. Read More.

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The Power of City Dividends

Change is happening across America from the bottom up. Read more about how cities and metro regions are shaping America's future at Code for America.

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Homeless for the Holidays

Most Americans will enjoy Thanksgiving dinner in the comfort of their own home. But for more than 1.17 million children, that won't be possible because they have no home, according to the U.S. Department of Education (DE).

That count is from the 2011-2012 school year, and reflects a 10 percent increase from the 2010‐2011 school year total of 1,065,794. The states with the largest numbers of homeless students were California, New York. Texas, and Florida.

"The DE figures are a shocking reminder of the intense shortage of decent affordable housing in our country, and the consequences it has for our children," said Andre Shashaty, president of Partnership for Sustainable Communities, a national nonprofit education and advocacy group. Shashaty is also the author of the forthcoming book, Death of a Dream: The end of 50 years of progress for cities and the rise of the new American slum.

The actual total number of homeless children is probably closer to 1.7 million, Shashaty said. This is an estimate that is based on adding to DE figures kids who are homeless but not of school age or who are not enrolled in public schools.

Authored by Andre Shashaty.

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Call for Presentations: Historic Preservation in America’s Legacy Cities

The Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University and the Cleveland Restoration Society are convening an interdisciplinary meeting to discuss the role of historic preservation in revitalizing America’s legacy cities, where long-term population loss and economic decline present significant challenges for the future of the urban built environment. These cities have significant cultural heritage and a large stock of historic buildings, yet vacancy and abandonment are very pressing realities and, at times, demolition may be the best course of action.

At this crucial juncture, cities face difficult questions. What is the role that preservation can and should play in shaping the future of legacy cities? How can historic assets be identified and leveraged for planning and revitalization? What benefits and impediments exist in integrating preservation into community and economic development? How should we make decisions about what to save and what to destroy? This convening will be an opportunity to collaborate, share ideas, and devise solutions, with the goals of launching a more integrated approach to planning for the future of legacy cities, bringing preservation into urban policymaking, and crafting a 21st-century preservation profession that is responsive to current needs and conditions. Read more and submit a proposal to present at this conference.

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